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New Visitor
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎08-07-2009
Accepted Solution

Installing a replacement router

I currently have a wireless B router behind my cable modem.  I have purchased a new wireless G router to replace the current router. I can configure the new router with the same inside IP address and services that the current router has so that my inside devices will connect to the new router.  But when I connect the new router to the Comcast side inplace of my current router my outside MAC address will certainly be different.  Does Comcast cache the MAC of my router and if so is there a way for me to get it cleared from the cache or do I need to contact Comcast technical support to be able to install and use the new router to connect?

 

Thanks,  7t2z

Connection Expert
JamesR
Posts: 6,276
Registered: ‎09-29-2007

Re: Installing a replacement router

Power Down the new Router

Reset the Modem

Let the modem come up and stabilize

Power up the New Router

 

that will dump the memorized MAC address of the old router and acquire the MAC address of the new router;

 

If the Modem has a Reset Swith buried in a small hole on the back of the modem, use a toothpick or Ball Point Pen to reach in and depress the switch

 

If No reset switch, pull the power cored out of the Modem let it sit for 30 seconds and then reapply Power.

 

 

New Visitor
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎08-07-2009

Re: Installing a replacement router

I discovered that the new router has the ability to "clone" an outside MAC address.  I specified the MAC of the old router and had no problems what so ever.  Problem resolved.
Bronze Problem Solver
Posts: 5,958
Registered: ‎03-12-2004

Re: Installing a replacement router

[ Edited ]

7t2z wrote:
I discovered that the new router has the ability to "clone" an outside MAC address.  I specified the MAC of the old router and had no problems what so ever.  Problem resolved.

It is never required to clone any mac addresses to use Comcast. I suspect the power cycle procedure you used did not complete correctly. But if cloning works for you and you are happy with a cloned configuration then you are all set.

 

Just in case you want to try the power cycle sequence again:

 

Standard Power Cycle Procedure

Turn everything off – cable modem, router, PC(s) – and let them sit for a few minutes. If you have a modem that has a battery backup (telephony modems often do), press and hold its reset button until the modem reboots itself.

The order in which you do the following steps is critical - don't improvise! Turn on the cable modem, and let it come all the way up. Connect the WAN port (the one that’s by itself) of the router to the cable modem, and turn on the router. Wait for the router to come all the way up. Connect your PC to one of the LAN ports (there are usually 4 of them, grouped together), on the router. Repeat for any other hard-wired PCs. If you are not using a router, connect the PC to the modem and boot the PC.

Last, if you are using wifi, boot up your wireless PC/laptop and let it find the wireless signal. Once it’s working properly, check the top thread in the Home Networking forum about how to secure the wireless connection and prevent others from stealing your bandwidth.

Message Edited by FishMan on 08-10-2009 07:01 AM
Regular Problem Solver
Posts: 787
Registered: ‎03-14-2005

Re: Installing a replacement router


FishMan wrote:

7t2z wrote:
I discovered that the new router has the ability to "clone" an outside MAC address.  I specified the MAC of the old router and had no problems what so ever.  Problem resolved.

It is never required to clone any mac addresses to use Comcast. I suspect the power cycle procedure you used did not complete correctly. But if cloning works for you and you are happy with a cloned configuration then you are all set.



The problem with cloning is that if you ever need to reset your router you'll lose your internet access until you either re-do the cloning (Do you still have that old MAC address handy?) or go through the modem reset sequence that would have been the preferred thing to do in the first place. But when you're poking around in unfamiliar territory, stopping as soon as you find something that works is understandable, too.

Contributor
Posts: 9
Registered: ‎09-28-2009

Re: Installing a replacement router

I'll power cycle anything before I start cloning (very dangerous territory to head into)
Connection Expert
EG
Posts: 40,226
Registered: ‎12-24-2003

Re: Installing a replacement router


slycat79 wrote:
I'll power cycle anything before I start cloning (very dangerous territory to head into)

 

Can you tell us exactly how it is "dangerous" ?