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Contributor
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎03-05-2010
Accepted Solution

What about cable surge protectors?

It seems like all the power line surge protectors on the market include in/out connectors for the cable. 

 

I have used the cable function on the surge protector for my PC's for a lot of years and never had any problems except temporary cable issues outside of the house.

 

A comcast service tech here to deal with a recent intermittent connection problem changed the modem and removed the cable from the surge protector.  He told my wife that these cable surge protectors can cause internet connectivity problems (I wasn't here.)

 

What is the real story with cable surge protectors? 

 

Richard

Cable Expert
JayInAlg
Posts: 12,041
Registered: ‎03-02-2007

Re: What about cable surge protectors?

[ Edited ]

You can't use them for TV or HSI, they will mess with the digital signals, it is a proven fact.

 

I also believe, that I do not want my coax so close to the AC wiring, that it will jump from one line to another because they are so close inside those devices.

 

The coax must be grounded at the entry to the buiding, and grounds the shield on the coax.  That is part of the National Electrical code.

 

Running ethernet through those AC surge proector strip's is the same deal, it will slow down your network, again, that is a proven fact.  There has been posters on this forum complaining on slow speeds and once their coax and/or ethernet was removed from those strips, they have gotten their speeds back.

Connection Expert
EG
Posts: 44,190
Registered: ‎12-24-2003

Re: What about cable surge protectors?

[ Edited ]

Tech was right. They can cause losses/phase shifts. Don't use one on the coax !

Contributor
Posts: 5
Registered: ‎03-05-2010

Re: What about cable surge protectors?

Thank you both for your advice. 

 

Does the grounding of the coax at the entry to the building protect against lightning strikes?

 

Is this whole lightning and surge protector business an over reaction to a virtually nonexistent threat?   They sure sell a lot of AC surge protectors for electronic equipment.

 

Since coax surge protectors are ubiquitous this info should be included in the FAQ.  If it is I couldn't find it.

 

Richard

Cable Expert
i-am-nerdburg
Posts: 11,347
Registered: ‎06-27-2009

Re: What about cable surge protectors?

Technically the coax drop system in your house is bonded not grounded. The idea is to equalize the electrical potential between your home's electrical system and the coax drop system. In other words; electricity wants to go to earth ground and will follow the path of least resistance. You don't want a faulty electrical system using coax for a ground or vice versa. For example, if there was foreign voltage on your coax and it had no place to go, it might find ground through your cable box (bad).

 

Lightning strikes are a different animal. The truth is if your house takes a direct lightning strike, the surge protector will get fried just like everything else. If you want to protect your electronics, you should use an Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS)  that has a line conditioner (provides constant voltage).

Visitor
tshephard
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎07-17-2010

Re: What about cable surge protectors?

Hi all - 1st post here - following Google for why G'ma's cable surge protector doesn't feed signal through to internet/phone modem - apparently surge protector just absorbs high speed signal and efforts should be outside the house. I had checked her house and found a ground/bond between incoming house connection and electric service.

I read through recent posts and am still a bit confused - here's why. Many homes around here still have the entry system from 30 years ago when cable first arrived - and before all this money was invested in silicon rather than copper.

So - for state of the art - what exactly should we see? For instance, at my 20 year old house - there is a 'block' that only seems to break the cable and insert a connection for a single ground. It is an F connector, then a single screw for a ground wire, and then another F connector. So I suppose most surges ON THE GROUND/SHIELD will be carried to the ground rod. What happens to a surge on the inner/signal conductor? I believe they make grounding connectors with a very small gap between the signal conductor and the ground conductor - as though a surge above X volts could jump across like a spark plug. Are these appropriate for Comcast systems? How should they be marked - UL XXXX or similar?

We have had a very stormy summer so far here in VA, and lots of folks lost gear - me and G'ma for instance - and there is a renewed interest in proper protection for all incoming lines.

 

Visitor
tshephard
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎07-17-2010

Re: What about cable surge protectors?

Bump for last post?

Cable Expert
i-am-nerdburg
Posts: 11,347
Registered: ‎06-27-2009

Re: What about cable surge protectors?

[ Edited ]

You really don't need anything special --just a ground block and appropriate ground wire. Even a splitter can be grounded properly and serve the whole drop system. The shield IS the ground for the center conductor. Think about it like an electrical outet - the hot wire can't be directly grounded or there would be no flow of electricity to your outlet -- but the outlet is still grounded with a seperate wire.

 

Where coaxial cable enters a building, the outer shield should be grounded as close as practicable (max 20 feet) to the point of attachment or termination (ground block.) All grounding systems including lightning protection are to be bonded together by means of a low-impedance current path.



New Visitor
notechnogeek
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎07-06-2012

Re: What about cable surge protectors?

I have a Panamax surge protector on my entertainment center and working with Comcast is very problematic. Comcast wants to put an amplifier on the cable line to boost the signal so I can run the cable thru the surge protector. I am not sure this will work but I am going to give it a try.  A recent lighting surge came thru the cable and knocked out the HDMI board on the receiver and was out for 2 months being repaired. I am trying to avoid this happening again. Any advice from the techies out there?

New Visitor
notechnogeek
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎07-06-2012

Re: What about cable surge protectors?

Panamax claims very little signal loss (0.5db)? with the coax cable running thru their equipment. The problem may be that that the cable signal is not strong enough or the DVR box is not compatible with the Panamax surge protector.

 

Any comments on this problem?

New Visitor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎02-01-2010

Re: What about cable surge protectors?

I have the Panamax M8AV and got it for precisely the reason you seem to have gotten yours.  I do not want to blow a board or anyhting with the equipment I have and did a lot of research on the Panamax products.  I get pixilation from the HD channels with the Panamax M8AV.  I also got a MD2-C for the smaller TV in the kitchen (no problems at all).  The main entertainment center is all plugged into the M8AV.  I don't have constant pixilation, but enough that it is very frustrating.  Panamax won't honor their coverage if the coaxial is not plugged in and frankly it seems to make sense to me to have it plugged in.  

 

Was Comcast going to charge you for the amplifier?  I may need to ask for one of them too.  Although I am getting close to jumping to FIOS.