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Visitor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎10-03-2009

Two wireless routers, one cable modem. Is this possible?

I would like to hook up two independant wireless routers with different SSID's to the same cable modem. I am renting the modem from Comcast and it only has one port. Will a switch work or is a router needed between the modem and wireless routers. Any special settings required?

 

Thx

Connection Expert
EG
Posts: 41,805
Registered: ‎12-24-2003

Re: Two wireless routers, one cable modem. Is this possible?

The modem will yield only one IP from CC so an ethernet switch wont work unless your particular market area allows more than one residential IP with which you would have to pay an additional charge for.

Recognized Contributor
bnaughty
Posts: 256
Registered: ‎06-16-2012

Re: Two wireless routers, one cable modem. Is this possible?

What is your desired goal?  Extending Wifi range?  Having 4+4 LAN ports?  List goes on...

Visitor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎10-03-2009

Re: Two wireless routers, one cable modem. Is this possible?

[ Edited ]

The desired goal is independant redundancy.

 

I live with housemates and am sometimes gone for days at a time. Occasionally, I get a call that the internet is down while I'm away. Usually it's a matter of resetting the wireless router because sometimes it fails to restart after a power outage and I'd rather not have them stomping around my area. (I prefer the hardware be in my room for easy access.)

 

It's possible that the latest firmware update fixed the problem but I would just rather have two independent wireless routers, with different (but similar) SSID's so that the connection has redundancy.

 

It sounds like a switch is out of the question but would a good router be an easy setup?

 

 

I know, I know, just spend the money on a wireless router that reboots properly during a power outage. But I have two good ones that I wouldn't mind running at the same time. The Cisco E1000 is the one I'm currently using and is the one that, in the past, has failed after a power outage. The second one is a Cisco E2000.

 

This, of course, is assuming that the equipment which feeds the two wireless AP's is rock solid and won't fail in a power outage.

 

Any suggestions for a better way of providing reliability/redundancy when I'm away from home, given my current equipment, would be welcome.

Recognized Contributor
bnaughty
Posts: 256
Registered: ‎06-16-2012

Re: Two wireless routers, one cable modem. Is this possible?

[ Edited ]

I had an E1000 for years and had ZERO issues...  Is it an issue where it just doesn't power back on or are computers still connected to the network but it's local access only (yellow triangle)?

 

If its local only access, it's still connected to the router, so, in the E1000 interface, you can allow wireless devices to access its interface and perform a reboot from there...  Certain modems can be logged into over the wireless as well to reboot them...

 

I rarely mess with the power cords anymore, and I have 3 devices...  I'll reboot my Arris from 192.168.100.1, then my wireless bridge from 192.168.1.149 (found in the router's DHCP lease table), and then the router from 192.168.1.1...  All from my laptop...  Voila...  full powercycles while sitting on the couch watching TV...

 

If it's the issue where it just doesn't power back on at all, it's best to try and repair your router.... I want you to perform a 30/30/30 reset.  Using a pencil or pen, hold the factory reset for 30 seconds while powered, pull the power cord, STILL holding the reset for 30 seconds, power it back on, STILL holding the reset for 30 more seconds...  90 total seconds of holding the reset, just 30 seconds in the middle there powered off to clear out its NVRAM chip... Then I want you to load the latest F/W even if it already has the latest F/W on it....   After a few minutes of operation after the F/W load, perform another 30/30/30 reset....  Then set back up your router settings...  That *should* make it function properly again...  Also investigate do you have a faulty power adapter...  All cisco power adapters are universal, and you have two of them...

 

Trying to fix it the way you want to is not possible...  The modem feeds the router, and that router will have to feed the second router...  that doesn't solve your issue...  Having a fully functional router is your only option, unless you're still connected to it locally and reboot it wirelessly....  Try the intensive resets, f/w load, and setting it back up...

 

I used to have your same setup except it was 2 E1000's....  I loaded custom DD-WRT F/W to one of the routers and configured it as a repeater bridge....  So I had the main one upstairs, and the custom one downstairs wirelessly connected feeding my TV and XBox from the LAN slots while also boosting my network :smileycool:

 

Recognized Contributor
bnaughty
Posts: 256
Registered: ‎06-16-2012

Re: Two wireless routers, one cable modem. Is this possible?

[ Edited ]

Here is the link to custom f/w for routers:

 

DD-WRT

 

If you end up with a brick, it's your own fault...  Loading DD-WRT to one of the routers will give you the ability to link routers either by ethernet or wireless....  The custom router can be configured as the following:

 

Access Point

Switch

Repeater

Repeater Bridge

Client

Client Bridge

WDS

OSLR

 

Linking Routers

Visitor
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎10-03-2009

Re: Two wireless routers, one cable modem. Is this possible?

Thanks for all the great info. I've been meaning to attempt a remote reset but I would have to research how to find the E1000. I'm pretty good with computers but not as much with networks.

 

The unit would power on but no SSID. I think all the lights would flash together. Hasn't done it in a while so maybe I'll abandon the idea and just keep the E2000 ready to swap if the E1000 fails.

 

I've flashed DD-WRT before on a different router but currently I have a simple setup, so no need.

 

Any thoughts on the 2000 vs 1000?

 

 

Recognized Contributor
bnaughty
Posts: 256
Registered: ‎06-16-2012

Re: Two wireless routers, one cable modem. Is this possible?

If the SSID disappears and all lights are blinking, the router did not initialize properly, and a remote reset will not work...  Have you tried all the 30/30/30 resets?  That usually fixes that...

 

The 2000 is a slightly better router, supposed to be stronger wifi range, but same MBPs throughput on your local network...

 

If I had your equipment, here is what I would do...  Configure the E2000 as the primary router connected from the modem...  Flash DD-WRT f/w to the E1000....  The two routers can be linked either by ethernet or through wireless...

 

Ethernet Linking:

 

Access Point / Switch

Extend the Wireless access area using more routers, with WIRED connections between routers, or turn a wired port on an existing network into a Wireless Access Point. All computers will be on the same network segment, and will be able to see one another in Windows Network.

  • Wireless Access Point - Extend Wi-Fi & LAN (Requires physical ethernet connection between routers)
  • Switch - Similar config as WAP, but radio disabled (accepts only wired connections)

Wireless Linking:

 

Repeater / Repeater Bridge

Extend the Wireless access area using a second router WIRELESSLY connected to the primary.

  • Repeater Bridge - A wireless repeater with DHCP & NAT disabled, clients on same subnet as host AP (primary router). That is, all computers can see one another in Windows Network.
  • Repeater - A wireless repeater with DHCP & NAT enabled, clients on different subnet from host AP (primary router). Computers connected to one router can not see computers connected to other routers in Windows Network.
  • Universal Wireless Repeater - Uses a program/script called AutoAP to keep a connection to the nearest/best host AP.

 

Client / Client Bridge

Connect two wired networks using a WiFi link (WIRELESS connection between two routers).

  • Client Bridged - Join two wired networks by two Wireless routers building a bridge. All computers can see one another in Windows Network.
  • Client Mode - Join two wired networks by two Wireless routers (unbridged). Computers on one wired network can not see computers on other wired network in Windows Network.

Basically you are extending your network...  choosing how to configure it will be based on your network needs...  If you have a SmartTV, Xbox, PS3, go with Client Bridge (a wirelessly connected switch)...

 

If you want want to boost WiFI range, go with Repeater Bridge (keep in mind it will half your network's total bandwidth, I recommend don't use it)...

 

It's all based on what you need the second router for...