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Connection Expert
EG
Posts: 40,205
Registered: ‎12-24-2003

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX


CajunTek wrote:

 

The times... they are a changing....


And not for the better.. !

Contributor
rooger
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎08-08-2009

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

I have not found a Comcast Mac user who has not (yet) gotten that bald, false, accusation.

 

 

You've found one now! I've never gotten that letter and never had that problem from comcast.

Been using a mac since '95(PPC 9500) and haven't had any problems with a virus etc.

Im on an Ibook g-4 

Email Expert
Posts: 18,241
Registered: ‎04-27-2004

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

Rooger, did you realize that you're replying to a comment made more than a year ago? Do you really think he still cares?
Email Expert
Latoque
Posts: 4,939
Registered: ‎06-10-2006

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

Just an update.  Today I was able to download McAfee VirusScan for Mac.  I had contacted Comcast Support and they sent me a link for it.  Now I just have to figure out how to use it.

 

  http://www.smith.edu/smithsoftware/virex.html

___________________________________________________________________________________________________
These are customer to customer support forums. We are paying customers just like you. We volunteer our time to try and help other customers with how-to help, and troubleshoot problems if we can. We can't look at your account. The only Comcast employees in the forums are those with their names in RED.
Visitor
emilepmartin
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎04-23-2010

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

Forum Modulators, please post this as a sticky for others to see...

 

Comcast has now partnered with Symantec to provide Norton Security Suite for both Windows & Macintosh users for free. Go to http://security.comcast.net to login and download your free copy.

Email Expert
Posts: 18,241
Registered: ‎04-27-2004

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

[ Edited ]

It may be free, but it's still unnecessary.

 

"modulators" -- LOL

Web Page Expert
BethKatz
Posts: 6,086
Registered: ‎11-14-2006

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

No need to download extra anti-virus software for your Mac.


I have this argument almost every month at my Apple users group meeting. 


Practice good Internet hygiene. Don't click on attachments. Don't forward stuff.

 

Make Backups. There's a reasonable chance you'll eventually have a hard disk crash.

Mac Expert
Joel
Posts: 5,829
Registered: ‎12-01-2003

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

Also, Norton for Mac has a tendancy for some users to cause more problems than it is worth. Personally, I've already dealt with users experiencing extreme system slowdowns and the "spinning beach ball" after installation. Removal of Norton returns the system to normal. YMMV of course. Programs of this type have too many "hooks" into your system. I still recommend ClamXav for those who feel the need to have some sort of protection installed. Since there are still no OSX viruses, many consider AV software a waste of resources.

Regular Contributor
Posts: 31
Registered: ‎08-12-2003

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

Don't screw up your machine just because Comcast tells you to.

 

You cannot get viruses from JPGs or PDFs.

 

If you had malware on your machine, it would alert you before it downloaded and you could stop it.

 

I just got one of these notices and it's the first but it's just telling about the new 'service'.

 

I have no unprotected wifi, and I don't think anyone is sending spam from my computers..

 

So, I will continue to be careful but I think this is just a way for Comcast themselves to get into your system.

Contributor
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎03-14-2008

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

 

Don't be paranoid, while there are very few Mac specific viruses there are many that you can spread.   Inatlling AV on your machine is being a good Netizen.

MacLady wrote:

Don't screw up your machine just because Comcast tells you to.

 

You cannot get viruses from JPGs or PDFs.

 

If you had malware on your machine, it would alert you before it downloaded and you could stop it.

 

I just got one of these notices and it's the first but it's just telling about the new 'service'.

 

I have no unprotected wifi, and I don't think anyone is sending spam from my computers..

 

So, I will continue to be careful but I think this is just a way for Comcast themselves to get into your system.


 

Contributor
rooger
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎08-08-2009

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

[ Edited ]

If you use a Mac and follow basic rules, i.e. do not open unknown attachments you WILL NEVER get a virus or malware.....I've been using a Mac since '95 and never had a Virus..... It has nothing to do with beind "A good Netizen"! It has to do will common sense......You cannot pass on malware nor viruses with a MAC THIS has been proven over and over again. I should know...I've worked for Symantec and Norton also I helped beta test kapernski......It has to do with windows being a shell of DOS...it IS NOT an operating system per se. MAC has UNIX as its underpinning.....Windows has DOS which has more holes in it than 30 yr old underwear! That last comment comes from the Head of Symantec when during a meeting with engineers, said that and "that we could take advantage of it"

 

MAC specific viruses are toys to be played with.....And the operating system is designed to stop them cold and warn you 1st.....Thats what a rock solid UNIX underpinning will do for you....If you lock UNIX down like apple has had major success doing by the way...Viruses and malware cannot get in.

 

I've seen Mac users install all sorts of anti-virus and then wonder why the comp runs so slow...Paranoia is not a strong enough word for those People IMHO.

Regular Contributor
Posts: 31
Registered: ‎08-12-2003

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

Thank you Rooger I agree.

 

I can't 'give' a virus to the hapless PC users.

 

You can't download it on the Mac without realizing it.

 

Oh my Mom did, but she is 89. She did not know what button to hit to make the alert go away when on the better homes website.

 

And it was nagware... that I easily removed from the desktop and library.

 

I used to work for AOL and my job was opening the viruses and analyzing them and then going after the phishers and taking down their websites... It was great fun!

 

My name was Host Comp Aapl.

 

 

 

 

Contributor
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎03-14-2008

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

Wrong wrong and wrong.  If you have windows file sharing turned on you can propgate the virus with out you knowledge. If you forward the funny pdf or jpeg that bob sent you you can prpogate a virus.  If you think that you can't propogate viruses then you don't know what you are talking about. 

Contributor
rooger
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎08-08-2009

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

I've never been accused of spamming by comcast...and i've been a comcast user for 5 yrs.

Contributor
rooger
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎08-08-2009

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

Bullshvt....................... No way no how even if winblows file sharing is turned on....your MAC ( if you've set it up correctly) will NEVER propigate a virus.

Email Expert
Posts: 18,241
Registered: ‎04-27-2004

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

Sorry you're wrong rooger.

 

Suppose someone sends you an email that contains a virus attachment, and you forward it to a friend who uses a PC. When he opens the email, he could be infected by the virus.

 

It's kind of like Typhoid Mary.

Contributor
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎03-14-2008

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

 

They are called worms, they looks for windows fileshares and write the files there,  If some one clicks on them they are infected. 
You can spread viruses without your knowledge it happens and it happened @ my company.  I think I know what I am talking about. 



rooger wrote:

Bullshvt....................... No way no how even if winblows file sharing is turned on....your MAC ( if you've set it up correctly) will NEVER propigate a virus.


 

Web Page Expert
BethKatz
Posts: 6,086
Registered: ‎11-14-2006

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

Nevertheless, if you don't forward attachments and pay attention to where you click, Mac users do not need to install additional anti-virus software. We have an operating system that we keep updated. Many of the protections we need are built into the operating system.


My Macs at home and school do not have additional anti-virus software, but I don't have openly shared file spaces.

Email Expert
Posts: 18,241
Registered: ‎04-27-2004

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

I agree with Beth. I also don't bother with any AV software on my Mac, and I didn't install any on my mother's.

 

My company does run AV software on the Macs they supply us, though. I've never heard of it being triggered. Of course, there's also virus filtering on the mail server, so the most likely vector for viruses arriving on any machine is blocked pretty well.

Contributor
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎03-14-2008

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

You wouldn't hear of the virus' that the software catches, enterprise level software generally logs the catch and does not pop up a window.  Look it's your machine do what you wish, but you are deluding yourself if you believe that you can't infect someone else. 

Official Employee
charvey
Posts: 1,662
Registered: ‎07-09-2008

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

 


rooger wrote:

Bullshvt....................... No way no how even if winblows file sharing is turned on....your MAC ( if you've set it up correctly) will NEVER propigate a virus.


 

Read this: http://www.macnn.com/articles/10/10/27/hides.as.a.video.via.social.networking.email/

 

Of course it's your right to not believe it, but all the security experts I've spoken to are saying within the next two years is going to see an acceleration in OSX targeted viruses, and it'll start in cross platform apps like PDF, Flash etc. Unfortunately this is due to the over-whelming success of the Mac platform.

 

If you aren't aware Koobface is one of the main trojans used for identity and financial theft.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Koobface

 

 

Regular Contributor
Ferdsky
Posts: 85
Registered: ‎11-14-2004

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

The fact remains that Koobface is not a virus. The only Anti-Virurs that is effective for this type of malware is installed between the users ears.

 

Read http://rixstep.com/2/20101029,00.shtml for further clarification.

 

charvey wrote:

 

Of course it's your right to not believe it, but all the security experts I've spoken to are saying within the next two years is going to see an acceleration in OSX targeted viruses, and it'll start in cross platform apps like PDF, Flash etc. Unfortunately this is due to the over-whelming success of the Mac platform.


Security experts have been saying that for many years. Sooner or later their predictions may be correct, but for the time being there is no effective Anti-Virus for Mac OS X, because there are no Mac OS X viruses. 

 

 

Web Page Expert
BethKatz
Posts: 6,086
Registered: ‎11-14-2006

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

It is very telling that people selling and pushing anti-virus software are the ones always warning us about the need for anti-virus software. 


You have security software on your Mac OS X computer. It's called your operating system. Keep it updated.

 

 

Official Employee
charvey
Posts: 1,662
Registered: ‎07-09-2008

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

 


Ferdsky wrote:

The fact remains that Koobface is not a virus. The only Anti-Virurs that is effective for this type of malware is installed between the users ears.

 

Read http://rixstep.com/2/20101029,00.shtml for further clarification.

 

Security experts have been saying that for many years. Sooner or later their predictions may be correct, but for the time being there is no effective Anti-Virus for Mac OS X, because there are no Mac OS X viruses. 

 


 

Indeed you are correct in stating that koobface is not a virus. Security folks, folks in the industry and technically savy folks would understand the difference between malware and a virus. But, if you stopped someone on the street and said "you have a unauthorized piece of software on your computer that is either sending spam, trying to obtain your financial records, or otherwise doing some kind of harm to your computer, your privacy or other computers around you".. I think nearly everyone would say "you mean a virus?".  So hence in a forum like this we tend to use the term 'virus' to mean something you don't want on your computer doing some kind of harm.

 

I suspect there's a defensive position most mac users are taking by the suggestion the Mac OS is somehow insecure and therefore susceptible to attack. That's not the position I've seen in this thread and it's not the position I see security folks taking too. I would suggest it's accepted that a fully patched version of the OSX operating is secure (but that's an argument which could be made of a windows machine too) and therefore require no third party defense mechanisms. But it's rarely the case that any computer is fully patched to the latest version of everything, which would include java, flash, pdf's etc. The article I referenced didn't sound the alarm on the OS itself, but rather a cross platform application layer that can be used to infect the machine it's running on as the first vector of attack..

 

The link you provided is interesting, but seems flawed. The authors supposition is that you'd have to follow those steps of downloading an applet after receiving an invitation and then work through the installation accepting a self signed security certificate. In the authors mind this is clearly insane and therefore you wouldn't get infected. To my mind it doesn't pass the 'mother test'. Time and again we see infections by such trivial mechanisms where users are trusting of the invitation, distracted, not knowledgable or a host of other reasons they accept these steps and become infected. Once infected there's no flashing lights to say "you've just done something silly".. the computer still works as expected so most infectee's don't even know what just happened.

 

The rise in the popularity of the Mac platform means more malicious software will be targeted at it. It's just the laws of economics, it'll happen. It's already starting to happen utilizing flaws in PDF's, flash, Java and other application layers and it'll continue to increase. It's not clear if the writers of this malicious code will start to target the OS itself or if they'll settle for the application infection method since it's easier and cross-platform, but I wouldn't bet on all of the 'bad actors' ignoring it forever more.

 

I, like many of the folks on this forum have enjoyed the performance gains that my three mac's have over my one windows machine due to not running any kind of AV software. But, times are changing and will continue to do so all the time the mac is the success it is.

 

Houses who adopt Mac's probably do so in addition to Windows machines they may already have. Some obviously replace outright, but you'll see households with mixtures of Windows and Mac's and other smart mobile devices. All of these devices become an attack vector for the bad actors in the ecosphere, and the goal is to infect as much as possible for the biggest gain. Gain means different things to different actors, some may just wish to send spam, some may phish for banking details, but a broader coverage of devices in your house is better for those that want that information because it's valuable data.

 

It's important to not kid ourselves into thinking that just because you wouldn't do something silly like download an applet and accept a self signed cert, that your next door neighbor (or their kid, aunt, mother, uncle, grandparents) wouldn't. The more technically savy folks are aware of the risks but there's a whole host of other computer users who can barely navigate the web. I would propose that many of the new Mac users are less tech savy than those who've gone before. I've had numerous conversations with friends who having heard about the popularity and ease of "the mac" they are interested in trying this new technology (new to them) since it's popular and frankly very cool. Apple, after all, do make very cool and interesting devices.

 

Unfortunately Mac is now on the radar screen of the 'bad actors' in this world and it's only going to get worse.

 

 

 

Connection Expert
EG
Posts: 40,205
Registered: ‎12-24-2003

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

[ Edited ]

Kudos to you charvey !

FWIW here, I couldn't agree more with you sir !!!

Very well written composition !!!

I've been saying similar for years now.

Those with Macs seem to still be in denial.....

Contributor
rooger
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎08-08-2009

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

No. 1 Wikipedia IS not a reliable source.

No. 2 UNIX.........will not propigate a virus........ever.

No.3 you state....... it'll start in cross platform apps like PDF, Flash etc. "cross platform" are the operative words! Unix is secure ......has been for a LONG time. Windows is STILL built on DOS...It is STILL a Shell of DOS no matter what Microshaft tells you! It IS NOT an operating system. UNIX IS, which is what Apple did......built a graphical user interface for UNIX..

No.4..... I know all about koobface.......All the security wonks I know(and I know the biggies) think its a joke.....If you are 1 of the few "in the"know"........ there is a whole industry built around anti virus software for BOTH platforms because   "there is ALOT of money in it".

 

No.5 all the Unix People I know....use it.....and always will because like I said "once UNIX is locked down"

( if you know how too, which the average user does not know how too) your not going to get in.

 

No.6  but all the security experts I've spoken to are saying within the next two years is going to see an acceleration in OSX targeted viruses.  LMAO they've been saying that since OS7.5  Pre Unix..... and? still NO Mac Virus that harms your machine.....Experts? lots of book smarts but no real experience! In my opinion......like I said I've been in the buisness since "95" No way no how...... Unless and I stress unless YOU DL it and Install it........Microshaft can't say that and they don't want too! they'd lose money! 

Official Employee
charvey
Posts: 1,662
Registered: ‎07-09-2008

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

Rooger, if I read your post correctly (which is somewhat hard given the passion with which you write), I think you are simply saying that a virus can't harm a properly locked down unix machine. I agree with that. I have run many of them over the years and I agree a well administered, currently updated unix machine is extremely secure. Not infaliable, but secure. However a non-updated and non-secure machine is not infaliable. You can't simply say "unix is secure" because "unix" is a tool and configured incorrectly can be just as insecure as anything else. I would suggest that you that if I put an unpatched unix machine on a public network without locking it down tightly, it would be hacked within a few minutes which is roughly the same as a windows machine. I'd rather you didn't do this because of the consequences of such an experiment.

 

Thankfully Mac OSX arrives out the box pretty well secured and therefore offers great security upon installation which is a great start and we can thank Apple for this. But you said yourself not the average user knows how to lock down a system, so let's thank Apple again.

 

This doesn't however stop the average user from downloading malware (otherwise considered a 'virus' by the average person) which then goes about generating spam, attacking other machines on the network, spreading via facebook and phishing for your banking credentials.

 

So let me ask you, if you had a windows machine and were tricked into downloading malware such as koobface, or a Mac and similarly tricked into downloading boonana, if I as a 'bad actor' obtain your banking credentials and drain your accounts, do I care whether you are running Microsoft or Apple? I got your money either way.

Web Page Expert
BethKatz
Posts: 6,086
Registered: ‎11-14-2006

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

I don't run extra anti-virus software on any of the Macs in my house. They are all kept current on software updates. I don't use any web-based resources from Windows 7 running inside Virtual Box. I keep backups. 


But I just reminded my Apple user group members to be careful about what they click on.


I also reminded them that they really should have separate admin and other user accounts. That's probably one of the biggest holes in Mac security.


Yes, Unix is relatively secure. NeXT taking over Apple was one of the best things to happen to the Mac because they slid Unix under the "Mac" user interface. But remember that the Morris worm in 1988 (its anniversary is today) infected Unix machines. Unix does not equal safe. 

 

I don't store my banking credentials or credit card info on my computer. I don't trust these things.

Official Employee
charvey
Posts: 1,662
Registered: ‎07-09-2008

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

 


BethKatz wrote:

I don't run extra anti-virus software on any of the Macs in my house. They are all kept current on software updates. I don't use any web-based resources from Windows 7 running inside Virtual Box. I keep backups.


 

And there are many folks like yourself who are savvy enough to understand how to avoid a virus, but sadly there are a very large number who are not and so we need to caution everyone to be careful and utilize every defense tool they can. For most this will mean an increasing use of AV type software (sadly), for others, possibly not.

 


But I just reminded my Apple user group members to be careful about what they click on.


 

Good, diligence is the first line of defense.

 


I also reminded them that they really should have separate admin and other user accounts. That's probably one of the biggest holes in Mac security.


 

Agreed, and hopefully Apple will change this security stance and look for any other security improvements as they become more of a target.

 


Yes, Unix is relatively secure. NeXT taking over Apple was one of the best things to happen to the Mac because they slid Unix under the "Mac" user interface. But remember that the Morris worm in 1988 (its anniversary is today) infected Unix machines. Unix does not equal safe. 


 

I don't recall NeXT taking over Apple (perhaps you didn't mean it that way)? I believe Apple acquired them because they wanted to move from the old Mac OS, most likely for a unix kernel and object oriented approach which was really big in the 90's. It's also worth remembering that Openstep is unix like, but isn't the same as the typical *nix we're used to see today. There's definite differences between the OSX underpinnings and the typical Linux variants we see in the corporate world today. The good news is the breeding is similar and hence much of the philosophy.

 

If anyone thinks just because it's unix means it's safe, they need to read up on what a rootkit is.

 


I don't store my banking credentials or credit card info on my computer. I don't trust these things.


But others do. And sadly if you read back in this thread, MacLady was asserting that you can't download a virus on a Mac without realizing it and in the next sentence said her older mother did exactly that. Thankfully it wasn't a serious event, but it could well have been and that's how easily it happens and your privacy and financial life gets wrecked.
My point being that people do this every day so common sense isn't a defense for the masses. Mostpeople have much more information on their home computers than they realize which can be used bybad actors'. I use the term "home computers" carefully because it could mean Mac, Windows, Smartphones or other devices. Because there were very attacks in the mainstream for the OSX platform, this behavior didn't get you into trouble before. As we see more mainstream virus' in the wild this'llbecome a serious issue for everyone who uses a device they otherwise thought was secure. This btw, would include phones, but i'll leave that digression alone for now. '

 


Web Page Expert
BethKatz
Posts: 6,086
Registered: ‎11-14-2006

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

 


charvey wrote:

BethKatz wrote:

 

Yes, Unix is relatively secure. NeXT taking over Apple was one of the best things to happen to the Mac because they slid Unix under the "Mac" user interface. But remember that the Morris worm in 1988 (its anniversary is today) infected Unix machines. Unix does not equal safe. 

 


 

I don't recall NeXT taking over Apple (perhaps you didn't mean it that way)? I believe Apple acquired them because they wanted to move from the old Mac OS, most likely for a unix kernel and object oriented approach which was really big in the 90's. It's also worth remembering that Openstep is unix like, but isn't the same as the typical *nix we're used to see today. There's definite differences between the OSX underpinnings and the typical Linux variants we see in the corporate world today. The good news is the breeding is similar and hence much of the philosophy.

 

I meant the takeover the way I wrote it. Apple bought NeXT, but Steve Jobs ended up in charge of Apple as did a lot of the higher up technical people. OpenStep was solidly Unix (based on Mach which was BSD Unix). The development environment was superb and well ahead of its time. I could use a C-shell with no problems, but had an elegant user interface that just worked.

 

If nothing else, the NeXT computers showed that you could have the security and stability of Unix along with an elegant and consistent user interface. The consistency is still missing from the Linux world although it's better now than it was. To me, Linux still feels clunky. 

 

At the time that Apple bought NeXT, they needed a more secure operating system for the Mac. Sliding the NeXT OS under the Mac interface and then slowly moving it forward made sense. But as someone who has a 19-year-old 25 MHz NeXTstation sitting in my office (rarely turned on but still usable), it sure appears that NeXT took over Apple. If you write apps for the iPhone, how often do you run into an NSsomething? NS is NeXTstep. Why do you use Objective-C?

 

NeXT took over Apple. We all ended up with a far more secure operating system in the deal.

 

Back to how to be reasonably safe with your Mac ....

- keep your operating system and software updated

- be careful where you click (untrusted certificates, strange email, fake banking, get-rich-quick, ...)

- for banking, go to the bank's site and initiate the interaction from there

- for anything asking for your password or fixes to your account, go to the site rather than clicking a link in email

- have a separate administrative account and user accounts and use the user accounts for normal activities

- be careful to download programs from reliable places; perhaps run them in a separate test account

- make backups (if nothing else, back up your most critical data to CD)


 

Web Page Expert
BethKatz
Posts: 6,086
Registered: ‎11-14-2006

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

Another way to look at this anti-virus software situation is why should I pay some company for something that Apple has a definite interest in integrating into their operating system far more effectively and responsively? Apple does not want to have a huge malware problem. It would be a public relations nightmare. 

 

Frankly, I don't trust any of the anti-virus companies. I'd still have to do all the things I mentioned above.


Official Employee
charvey
Posts: 1,662
Registered: ‎07-09-2008

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

 


BethKatz wrote:

Another way to look at this anti-virus software situation is why should I pay some company for something that Apple has a definite interest in integrating into their operating system far more effectively and responsively? Apple does not want to have a huge malware problem. It would be a public relations nightmare. 

 

Frankly, I don't trust any of the anti-virus companies. I'd still have to do all the things I mentioned above.



 

Until Apple adds these features (and I hope they do since natively it'll be better integration than a third party), customers will have to rely on third party systems.


btw, I disagree with your interpretation of NeXT and Apple (I remember the aquisition and politics, stock and reputation of Steve pretty well) but I don't want to sideline this topic into a conversation about that.

Mac Expert
Joel
Posts: 5,829
Registered: ‎12-01-2003

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

I've been MIA with family issues for a while, but I'm with Chris on this one. We've seen a gradual but steady increase in the proliferation of malware aimed at Mac users, and Rooger can make all the claims he wants about the security of *nix, but when malware is disguised as innocent jpgs, or a mal-formed download link, or a free screensaver that is actually a script that steals all of your personal information, social engineering will always trump a relatively secure system. We've even seen malware aimed at the iOS. And don't think this won't be able to be transfered to your Mac during the synching process. For these times of "just in case," it doesn't hurt to have a back-up plan. ClamXav and Sophos are both free. Sophos is actually well-received and easy to use. Of course, Norton is free with your Comcast subscription. At some point, this continued arrogance by Mac users is going to cost lots of people lots of time and lots of money.

Contributor
MichiganSledder
Posts: 13
Registered: ‎12-06-2010

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

As a certified apple service tech and certified Mac Genius who worked for apple for 10 years

 

You dont need any virus protection whatsover on the Mac,  The only way you would need virus protection is if you are using VMware or Parallels Desktop for a windows install,  and you would need the virus protection on the Windows side,  not the Mac side.  Same goes if you have it dual booted  Windows and Mac.  Only virus protection on the windows side. 

 

The software they offer is nothing more then bloatware to cause your mac to run slower..   Leave it alone plain and simple.

Contributor
Posts: 10
Registered: ‎03-14-2008

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

[ Edited ]

LOL!  which is why we became internally certified!  With short sighted arrogance like this, this is why Apple continues to lag in the enterprise...

 

 


MichiganSledder wrote:

As a certified apple service tech and certified Mac Genius who worked for apple for 10 years

 

You dont need any virus protection whatsover on the Mac,  The only way you would need virus protection is if you are using VMware or Parallels Desktop for a windows install,  and you would need the virus protection on the Windows side,  not the Mac side.  Same goes if you have it dual booted  Windows and Mac.  Only virus protection on the windows side. 

 

The software they offer is nothing more then bloatware to cause your mac to run slower..   Leave it alone plain and simple.


 

Web Page Expert
BethKatz
Posts: 6,086
Registered: ‎11-14-2006

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

 


illiterati wrote:

... this is why Apple continues to lag in the enterprise...


There are plenty of stronger reasons for Apple's non-acceptance in business. Let's not turn this thread into  a discussion of them.

Official Employee
charvey
Posts: 1,662
Registered: ‎07-09-2008

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

 


MichiganSledder wrote:

As a certified apple service tech and certified Mac Genius who worked for apple for 10 years

 

You dont need any virus protection whatsover on the Mac,  The only way you would need virus protection is if you are using VMware or Parallels Desktop for a windows install,  and you would need the virus protection on the Windows side,  not the Mac side.  Same goes if you have it dual booted  Windows and Mac.  Only virus protection on the windows side. 

 

The software they offer is nothing more then bloatware to cause your mac to run slower..   Leave it alone plain and simple.


This is a very short-sighted stance, I hope your response to your customers is more measured and cautious.

 

Email Expert
Posts: 18,241
Registered: ‎04-27-2004

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

 


BethKatz wrote:

 


illiterati wrote:

... this is why Apple continues to lag in the enterprise...


There are plenty of stronger reasons for Apple's non-acceptance in business. Let's not turn this thread into  a discussion of them.


If anything, it's the other way around. The lower market share of Mac vs. Windows, especially in enterprises, is probably the biggest reason there's so little malware targeted at Macs.

 

Regular Contributor
Posts: 69
Registered: ‎12-01-2008

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

do you understand how difficult it is to exploit a standard mac user account vs a standard windows user account? You can do plenty of nasty things on a mac, you just need an in, and most of the time you do not. One fairly easy way is to fake the security window prompt for a admin username and password, from there you could have full access, but getting to that point is hard because most of the time you have to rely on the user to install it themselves. There are not hooks that they can use like activeX on windows. If you know how to navigate your mac and practice safe browsing habits, there is no need for an anti-virus on OSX. All it is going to do is eat your CPU cycles and free memory. There is no doubt a purpose for it, those that cannot manage their own computers, but anyone that plays it safe has no need. if you use anything I recommend this on OSX: http://www.clamxav.com/ it covers both mac and pc virii and will also check your email for bad attachments and etc. ClamXav is also free and needs no subscription. They update their definitions fairly often as well. 

 

Most corporate anti-virus software seems to be too much bloat for the job it serves.

Contributor
rooger
Posts: 6
Registered: ‎08-08-2009

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

[ Edited ]

 

"If you know how to navigate your mac and practice safe browsing habits, there is no need for an anti-virus on OSX."

 

 

That's the Key Sentence.... Almost ALL MAC user's I know are aware of this.

 

Well Said! You said it better than I could.

 

Official Employee
charvey
Posts: 1,662
Registered: ‎07-09-2008

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

 


rooger wrote:

 

"If you know how to navigate your mac and practice safe browsing habits, there is no need for an anti-virus on OSX."

 

 

That's the Key Sentence.... Almost ALL MAC user's I know are aware of this.

 

Well Said! You said it better than I could.

 


You must move in very auspicious circles then, because nearly every Mac user I know personally (and unrelated to the tech industry) hardly knows anything about their computer (much the same as most Windows users I know).

 

Those that chose the Mac, usually did so for it's ease of use and that they didn't need to become a computer nerd to operate it. They certainly know nothing about the kernel and wouldn't know what 'terminal' was if I showed it to them.

 

Hackers exploit these shortcomings in computer education, whether it's on Windows, Mac, Smartphones or any other platform. Add to that the emergence of cross platform hacks involving Adobe and other intermediate software and you have plenty of avenues to get a bot onto someone's machine.

 

The main reason Mac's have not yet been heavily targeted by 'bad actors' is the value proposition. That's changing with the success of the platform and unfortunately will only get worse. It's sad but it's true. No longer can you say "I have a Mac, so i'm impervious to virus or malware attacks".

 

Rammas makes a good point that a good start is to use s/w that monitors your download and other obvious areas such as desktop or your user account. By only monitoring these areas you aren't subjecting your machine to the types of AV that bog down the Windows machines and at least you have a good chance of not becoming "typhoid mary" by distributing something that might not affect your machine but might affect others.

 

 

Mac Expert
Joel
Posts: 5,829
Registered: ‎12-01-2003

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

[ Edited ]

Most Mac users I know barely know the proper methods for installing software from a disk image, so to think that these users (many of them long time Mac users), not to mention the myriad Windows switchers we now see due to the iOS halo effect, are impervious to the same social engineering methods that malware vendors use to compromise PCs is extremely naìve, not to mention dangerous. Waiting to protect oneself until after an infection is too late. What kind of IT professional would advise such a thing?

 

Joel Craig

Board of Directors

Illinois Macintosh Users Group

http://www.illinoismug.org

Connection Expert
EG
Posts: 40,205
Registered: ‎12-24-2003

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

HEAR HEAR Joel !!!!!!!!!

Contributor
Posts: 24
Registered: ‎04-05-2008

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

This discussion is very interesting.  I am an (unsophisticated) Mac user whose e-mail IS repeatedly being spoofed.  I downloaded Norton at Comcast's suggestion.  I ran the anti-virus software, which found no viruses.  I currently have the Firewall option open and keep getting "Unauthorized application" notifications ("Mach Kernal" whatever that means.

 

I am not sure what I should do now but I am STILL having spam e-mail sent from my e-mail.

 

HELP!!

Web Page Expert
BethKatz
Posts: 6,086
Registered: ‎11-14-2006

Re: Anti-Virus for Mac OSX

Your email address being spoofed doesn't mean that you have an infection. All the bad guys need is an email address. They create some of them out of thin air.

 

Wait out the spam. It will stop.

 

As for the Norton installation, I don't know how that works. The Mach Kernel is the central part of the Mac operating system.

 

May I suggest that if you are always running as the administrator that you set up a separate account for yourself and do all of your web browsing and activities in that account? Only use the administrator account for updates and installing software from known good guys.

Visitor
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎03-20-2009

Avoid Norton Security Suite for Mac!

In what was apparently an excess of caution, I downloaded and installed the free Norton Security Suite for my iMac and found it to be worth less than I paid for it - in other words worse than useless and downright harmful.  After installing it, I had problems with OSX (Snow Leopard) freezing.  I was unable to force quit applications and had to turn the computer off and on to unfreeze.  At the advice of Apple customer support, I erased the hard drive and reinstalled the operating system.  That should have eliminated any problems with the operating system.  I did extended hardware scan, which never found a problem and even took it to an Apple-certified repair shop.  They found nothing wrong with my computer.  When I said that I had Norton Security Suite, they said that is the problem.  Sure enough, I uninstalled it and have had no further problems with my computer.  Doesn't anyone at Symantec (the software company that creates Norton Security Suite) or Comcast every actually test these things?  How do they get the nerve to recommend this malware as a good idea?